/page/2

The Room by Joey Ho Design Limited

Despite being just one room, a Hong Kong restaurant is a topsy-turvy mix of walls, ceilings, windows and floors. 

A mix of architectural elements – think windows, staircases and balconies – are suspended from the ceiling and walls, creating divisions in space. According to Ho, the result creates a ‘room’ like concept, allowing designers to feel at home while eating. 

Tsukiage-An Restaurant by Doyle Collection Co.

A restaurant specializing in Japanese fishcakes is a study in lines: peripheral, criss-crossing, horizontal and vertical. 

The tunnel-like space is defined by a louvered ceiling covered with parallel wooden panels. The effect is an rhythmic pattern that’s visually pleasing. A slight peak at the roof’s centre creates a chalet-like aesthetic; designer Aiji Inoue of Doyle Collection Co. says this repetition also works to lead visitors deeper into the space. 

Warm lighting creates a sense of glow from within the shop, sure to attract passers-by in the popular Tonmonkan sightseeing district of Kagoshima, Japan. 

Field by Numen For Use

Croatian collective Numen/For Use’s latest project is a carpeted, floating field transforming a former slaughter house.

 Jonke says humans often perceive the world in two ‘paradoxical paradigms:’ as an immobile mass of infinite weight or as a plain, two-dimensional surface. The installation is intended to recall both of these mentalities. 

The designers also say the piece undergoes a vegetative cycle, ‘from sprouting to disintegration’,  which put them in the position of farmers. ‘From one side, we witness the incredible fact that plants grow out of cloth, and from the other we face the fatal consequences of insufficient or over irrigation,’ they say.  

I need your help :)

Please help me with my research by filling in this survey! Your help would be very much appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/VCKQV5M

Los Sopranos by Pedro Scatarella

Inspired by New York’s harbour warehouses, architect Pedro Scattarella has brought the atmosphere of an industrial port inside a Barcelona pizzeria. 

Elements like containers, merchandise boxes and industrial lamps can be traced throughout the two-storey interior. On the entrance level, an open kitchen allows customers to see how pizzas are prepared, almost as if attending a show. Concrete flooring and a brick wall enhance the industrial aesthetic in the space.

The ground floor visually connects to the upper one, thanks to the space’s double height. On the top floor is a large dining room, filled with four full-size shipping containers accommodating different functions like the bathroom, VIP room and exhibition showcase. 

Industrial graphic elements are spotted in several areas, helping to further enhance the warehouse feeling in the restaurant.

TROOVE Salon by Hiroyuki Miyake

In Gifu, about 400km west of Tokyo, a beauty salon reflects how Japanese society is questioning its necessities after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

The space is divided into two sections: in the fore-front is a waiting room with concrete walls and a single couch. Perpendicular half-walls divide this section from the back, which is lined with planks of Japanese oak that give the space a great sense of depth.

Overall, the salon appears to have a dark glow about it; according to designerHiroyuki Miyake, following the 2011 natural disasters, many towns in Japan lost power supplies or were asked to turn off lights.

IceShifts Series by Nicole Dextras

For her series IceShifts, environmental artist Nicole Dextras freezes garments into blocks of ice, creating installations and photographic reproductions.

Dextras’ art refers to nature and the environment. One of her main series consists of three-dimensional words made of ice or living plants, put in the urban or natural landscape. She links the projects to the seasons; ice corresponds to winter and the plants to summer.

IceShifts is a wintertime project that deals with the garment and nature. The idea originated from a photographic study of clothes and fabrics suspended in water.

Dextras froze dresses and garments into big blocks of ice. The result is beautifully delicate, thanks to the transparencies and play of lights passing through the iced fabrics. Although frozen, the figures have a mobile quality, as if they were gently dancing.

Langue Materielle Exhibition by Jimmy Robert

Jimmy Robert’s artistic practice relies on different media: collage, photography, installation, choreography and performance. Through these media, Roberts continuously questions the unsolved play between object and representation.

Through videos and installations Robert explores objects and bodies as carriers of language. Sheets of paper used in collages and photographic works are manipulated, folded and displaced. From their mere materiality, they acquire new meanings by means of the artist’s touch.

Robert also uses the body as a piece of paper, a white page to be ‘folded,’ touched and displaced. He elaborates choreographies to be performed as if the movement created a new representational reality.

Drawing and dancing are two aspects of movement that Robert also documents in three new video works. In them he focuses on the idea that gestures are a form of language that create a new order and new meanings.

gaellewedlake:

Starbucks Amsterdam Rembrantplein by Liz Muller and Starbucks Coffee

Starbucks will soon serve its daily brew with a dose of design at its first European concept shop, set to open Friday at Amsterdam’s famous Rembrandtplein square.

Dubbed Starbucks The Bank, the café is located in a former bank vault, below ground. Filled with only recycled or reclaimed furnishings, local artistry and eco-friendly initiatives, the shop is a far departure from cookie-cutter Starbucks that popped up worldwide through the 1990s and early 2000s.

Visitors enter the shop at street level, then descend into the 430-sq-m subterranean space that’s filled with nods to Dutch culture. One wall is made of ‘speculaas’ moulds (used to make a popular type of Dutch cookie), while another wall features a mural explaining about coffee’s history in Holland. Locals and tourists alike sample coffees at a ‘coffee theatre’ or enjoy cookies baked freshly in the store (the shop manager will even Tweet when a fresh batch is ready!)   

The shop has been built to meet Leed sustainable building guidelines; paints used were water-based and chemical free, while low-flow faucets conserve water and LED and CFL bulbs reduce energy consumption. Meanwhile, original marble floors (dating to 1926) were left intact, while recycled burlap sacks used for transporting coffee were used as décor.

The Room by Joey Ho Design Limited

Despite being just one room, a Hong Kong restaurant is a topsy-turvy mix of walls, ceilings, windows and floors. 

A mix of architectural elements – think windows, staircases and balconies – are suspended from the ceiling and walls, creating divisions in space. According to Ho, the result creates a ‘room’ like concept, allowing designers to feel at home while eating. 

Tsukiage-An Restaurant by Doyle Collection Co.

A restaurant specializing in Japanese fishcakes is a study in lines: peripheral, criss-crossing, horizontal and vertical. 

The tunnel-like space is defined by a louvered ceiling covered with parallel wooden panels. The effect is an rhythmic pattern that’s visually pleasing. A slight peak at the roof’s centre creates a chalet-like aesthetic; designer Aiji Inoue of Doyle Collection Co. says this repetition also works to lead visitors deeper into the space. 

Warm lighting creates a sense of glow from within the shop, sure to attract passers-by in the popular Tonmonkan sightseeing district of Kagoshima, Japan. 

Field by Numen For Use

Croatian collective Numen/For Use’s latest project is a carpeted, floating field transforming a former slaughter house.

 Jonke says humans often perceive the world in two ‘paradoxical paradigms:’ as an immobile mass of infinite weight or as a plain, two-dimensional surface. The installation is intended to recall both of these mentalities. 

The designers also say the piece undergoes a vegetative cycle, ‘from sprouting to disintegration’,  which put them in the position of farmers. ‘From one side, we witness the incredible fact that plants grow out of cloth, and from the other we face the fatal consequences of insufficient or over irrigation,’ they say.  

I need your help :)

Please help me with my research by filling in this survey! Your help would be very much appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/VCKQV5M

Los Sopranos by Pedro Scatarella

Inspired by New York’s harbour warehouses, architect Pedro Scattarella has brought the atmosphere of an industrial port inside a Barcelona pizzeria. 

Elements like containers, merchandise boxes and industrial lamps can be traced throughout the two-storey interior. On the entrance level, an open kitchen allows customers to see how pizzas are prepared, almost as if attending a show. Concrete flooring and a brick wall enhance the industrial aesthetic in the space.

The ground floor visually connects to the upper one, thanks to the space’s double height. On the top floor is a large dining room, filled with four full-size shipping containers accommodating different functions like the bathroom, VIP room and exhibition showcase. 

Industrial graphic elements are spotted in several areas, helping to further enhance the warehouse feeling in the restaurant.

TROOVE Salon by Hiroyuki Miyake

In Gifu, about 400km west of Tokyo, a beauty salon reflects how Japanese society is questioning its necessities after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

The space is divided into two sections: in the fore-front is a waiting room with concrete walls and a single couch. Perpendicular half-walls divide this section from the back, which is lined with planks of Japanese oak that give the space a great sense of depth.

Overall, the salon appears to have a dark glow about it; according to designerHiroyuki Miyake, following the 2011 natural disasters, many towns in Japan lost power supplies or were asked to turn off lights.

IceShifts Series by Nicole Dextras

For her series IceShifts, environmental artist Nicole Dextras freezes garments into blocks of ice, creating installations and photographic reproductions.

Dextras’ art refers to nature and the environment. One of her main series consists of three-dimensional words made of ice or living plants, put in the urban or natural landscape. She links the projects to the seasons; ice corresponds to winter and the plants to summer.

IceShifts is a wintertime project that deals with the garment and nature. The idea originated from a photographic study of clothes and fabrics suspended in water.

Dextras froze dresses and garments into big blocks of ice. The result is beautifully delicate, thanks to the transparencies and play of lights passing through the iced fabrics. Although frozen, the figures have a mobile quality, as if they were gently dancing.

Langue Materielle Exhibition by Jimmy Robert

Jimmy Robert’s artistic practice relies on different media: collage, photography, installation, choreography and performance. Through these media, Roberts continuously questions the unsolved play between object and representation.

Through videos and installations Robert explores objects and bodies as carriers of language. Sheets of paper used in collages and photographic works are manipulated, folded and displaced. From their mere materiality, they acquire new meanings by means of the artist’s touch.

Robert also uses the body as a piece of paper, a white page to be ‘folded,’ touched and displaced. He elaborates choreographies to be performed as if the movement created a new representational reality.

Drawing and dancing are two aspects of movement that Robert also documents in three new video works. In them he focuses on the idea that gestures are a form of language that create a new order and new meanings.

gaellewedlake:

Starbucks Amsterdam Rembrantplein by Liz Muller and Starbucks Coffee

Starbucks will soon serve its daily brew with a dose of design at its first European concept shop, set to open Friday at Amsterdam’s famous Rembrandtplein square.

Dubbed Starbucks The Bank, the café is located in a former bank vault, below ground. Filled with only recycled or reclaimed furnishings, local artistry and eco-friendly initiatives, the shop is a far departure from cookie-cutter Starbucks that popped up worldwide through the 1990s and early 2000s.

Visitors enter the shop at street level, then descend into the 430-sq-m subterranean space that’s filled with nods to Dutch culture. One wall is made of ‘speculaas’ moulds (used to make a popular type of Dutch cookie), while another wall features a mural explaining about coffee’s history in Holland. Locals and tourists alike sample coffees at a ‘coffee theatre’ or enjoy cookies baked freshly in the store (the shop manager will even Tweet when a fresh batch is ready!)   

The shop has been built to meet Leed sustainable building guidelines; paints used were water-based and chemical free, while low-flow faucets conserve water and LED and CFL bulbs reduce energy consumption. Meanwhile, original marble floors (dating to 1926) were left intact, while recycled burlap sacks used for transporting coffee were used as décor.

I need your help :)

About:

This is basically dedicated to the design world, using it as a scrapbook, posting my inspiration and amazing designs. :)
Feel free to visit my other blog: http://gaellewedlake.tumblr.com

Following: